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Today's Sports

  • Cedar Key boys overwhelmed by...

    The Bronson boys’ basketball team put together its best performance on the season against Cedar Key Monday with good ball movement on offense and opportunistic defense, as the Eagles cruised to a 74-36 win in District 1A-7 action.

    Seven different Eagles converted at least two field goals, while three – Julius Smith (11 points), Glen Cooper (10 points) and Tra Francis (10 points) – were in double figures, helping BMHS pick up its second win in the district.

  • Lady Eagles fend off plucky...

    What once looked like an easy win for Bronson approached nail-biter status midway through the fourth quarter.

    The Lady Eagles led by as much as 16 points in the third quarter Monday against Cedar Key, but the Lady Sharks charged back in the fourth to cut the deficit to seven points, before Bronson, led by senior Myia Knight, converted eight free throws down the stretch to pull way for a 50-37 win in an up-tempo district hoops clash in Bronson.

  • Cedar Key girls boast promising...

    Cedar Key girls’ basketball coach David Tomlin says this year’s varsity team might be more talented than last year’s, but the new crop of young players don’t have the experience to prove it quite yet.

    With seven girls gone from last year’s squad, a handful of promising newcomers are filling important roles for the Lady Sharks, especially on defense and on the boards, where eighth-grader Rylee Smith and freshman Niya Jones are two of the top team’s top rebounders.

  • Young Cedar Key boys hoops squad...

    The Cedar Key boys’ varsity basketball team needs that one thing that only time can deliver: experience.

    Most of this year’s roster, which doesn’t include a single senior, offers little returning experience, which means a steep learning curve is ahead for its players.

    First-year Sharks head coach Vance Dickey recognizes some strengths his team has to build on, particularly in the post, but the mental side of the game and the fundamentals will take time.

  • The length of daylight reminds...

    Although it is officially fall according to the calendar, some of our daytime temperatures are saying “July”. But the length of daylight is definitely reminding us that fall is here.

  • Dickey looks forward to leading...

    Vance Dickey had only recently arrived in Cedar Key to teach Phys Ed and head the boys hoops team, but he was already knee-deep in the program’s history as he cleaned out his new office.

    “Man, there are years and years – I shouldn’t say years, because that’s misleading – there are decades worth of stuff here,” Dickey says by phone while taking a break from the cleaning. “I’m picking up uniforms I’m thinking are from the 1960s or 70s, and they’re falling apart.”

  • Captain's Log: Tags tell a...

    It is interesting to hear the rumors about the UF trout tag reward research. I have had people tell me at the boat ramp that over 100 trout tags have been turned in, and there are a thousand more tags out there … wow, I think I need to help set the record straight.

    I talked to Mike Allen, director of the Nature Coast Biological Station, and he shared some data with me. The purpose of the tagging project is centered around mortality rates of catch and release of spotted seatrout.

  • Captain's Log: Regulations...

    In the past couple of years, our fishing regulations have seen a lot of changes. It is of course the anglers responsibility to keep up to date on the changes, or suffer the wrath of some expensive fines. All of these regulations of course are to keep our resource sustainable, which I fully endorse.

  • All in a day's catch

    Fileting the fish may not be the most fun of jobs, but the rewards at dinner are worth it.

    Capt. Carl Robinson, left, cleans the day's catch with Kip Riley.

  • Snook reopened in Gulf state...

    The recreational harvest season for one of Florida’s premier fish  —  snook  — reopens on March 1 in Florida’s Gulf of Mexico state and adjacent federal waters, including Everglades National Park and Monroe County. The season will remain open through April 30.