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Features

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  • Seven women gathered Friday at the Cedar Key Arts Center to learn about traditional Florida pine needle basket making from instructor Diane Moore, of Lake Helen.

  • To celebrate National Wildlife Refuge Week 2012, the Lower Suwannee NWR had several events throughout the week.  The celebratory ribbon cutting for the grand opening of the Lower Suwannee National Wildlife Refuge classroom was anticlimactic compared to the exciting events for the remainder of the day.

  • Cedar Key was abuzz this past weekend as thousands of visitors flooded the island for its 43rd Annual Seafood Festival. Throngs of visitors dined on various seafood delicacies, enjoyed the town’s colorful, lighthearted parade, visited the Seahorse Key light station and perused the many craft-filled tents lining the street. For more scenes from the festival, check the MULTIMEDIA portion of the Beacon homepage.

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  • Tuesday, Oct. 16, is the deadline for work to be delivered to the Cedar Key Arts Center on Second Street for its upcoming show. The open media show will be the first community wide event of the season. Any media is accepted and prizes will be awarded.

  • There will be a Fall Festival in the Park brought to you by some of the Cedar Key area churches and businesses on Tuesday, Oct. 30, from 4-7 p.m. Fun in the form of candy, games, prizes and food (hot dogs, drinks and chips) will be provided. Costumes are not required for children to attend the event, but, if worn, they should not be scary nor should they be suggestive.

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  • Covering about 70 percent of the world, water plays a critical role in life.

  •  Oct. 13-14 

  • Karen Pinkston leaned over the cracked slab and brushed away the dirt and grime of a century of neglect. The name of a young girl cast into the homemade stone, Missouri, was barely made visible.

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  • Beth Davis may be retiring from the Levy County School Board in November to make way for “new blood” but she is not slowing down.

  • Tony’s Three-Time World Champion Clam Chowder launched into the food service industry on Friday, Aug 10, at the Florida Food Service annual summer Food Show in St. Augustine.

     Tony’s Chowder is now available in cases of six 51 oz. cans, and is being distributed by Florida Food Service, Inc. and City Line Distributors in New England. 

     Tony’s Chowder fans can also order a case for themselves at www.tonyschowder.com.

  • Back on the farm at Twentymile Bend things had settled down after a brush by a tropical wave that dumped 12 inches of rain on top of us. 

    But my father, as usual, was thinking up ways to keep my brother Jerry and me busy. We were dreading what he might come up with next, because on a farm there were so many dirty jobs available. 

    I had spent one summer building fence and didn't want to have that ever again. 

  • Troy Chancey knows there’s no place like home.
    After a year of being shot at and interrogating enemy combatants in Afghanistan, the 22-year-old Army specialist admits being back in the relatively slow pace of Chiefland is a little strange. But life in the states is something he looks forward to getting used to again.
    “I wanna’ do a lot of the things I missed out on,” Chancey said Friday from the home of his grandparents Janice and Buster.

  • Cedar Keys National Wildlife Refuge hosted its summer open house of Cedar Keys Light Station celebrating the 158th anniversary last Saturday.  
    The Refuge partnered with Cedar Key Historical Society and Levy County Historical Society in order to bring historians and ambience to the significant historical site managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.
    “Refuges are places where the people of today can renew the ties to their cultural heritage by viewing ancient & historic sites,” reads the “Promise” document of 1996.  

  • About a dozen children, with parents in tow, showed up at the Cedar Key Public Library Friday afternoon to watch Geddy the Gecko perform.
       Geddy and the children danced, listened to short stories and songs about several South American countries. About halfway through the program, Geddy transformed into a larger, puffed up version of himself who promptly moved into a break dance routine that culminated with the oversized reptile spinning on his head.

  • By Melinda Myers
    Gardening Expert

    Don’t let summer stressors ruin your landscape’s good looks. Instead give your plants’ natural defenses a boost and keep both vegetable gardens producing and flowers blooming.
    Busy summer schedules can lead to plant neglect and less-than-picture-perfect gardens. When you team this with summer heat and drought that can lead to wilting, brown leaves and poor growth, and add insects and diseases that can further weaken and damage plants, gardens can really suffer.