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Features

  • On Jan. 22 Cedar Key Mayor Heath Davis asked three residents to serve on an Energy Advisory Panel to spearhead a citywide, citizen-based conservation movement.

    Faced with many tasks, Tom Deverin, Connie Nelson and Luz Kraujalis decided first to tackle the big project of recycling household and business garbage.

  • About eight months ago, 45-year-old Polly “P.J.” Jensen noticed a lump under her left arm.

    She was unable to afford health insurance and ineligible for Medicaid.

    “So I kind of set it aside at the time – something I should have never done,” P.J. said. “Something every women should never do.”

    After a while, the mild discomfort became painful tenderness. “It got to the point that I couldn’t wear anything tight around that area.”

    She finally went to the doctor early this month.

  • After 34 years of dedication, Cedar Key Postmaster Annette Kordgien retired from the United States Postal Service Oct. 1.

  • Airheads from all over the state converged on a 45-acre farm located between Cedar Key and Chiefland last weekend for the Second Annual Suwannee River Tech Day and Camp.

    The international Airheads Beemer Club is for riders who own specific BMW bikes: those with air-cooled engines. Most anything that happens with an Airhead Beemer can be repaired on the side of the road with the tool kit that BMW provides – with the right knowledge, of course.

    That’s why the Airheads motto is “Simple by Choice.”

  • ‘Twas the night before Christmas, when all through the isle,

    Not a clammer clamming, they were through for a while.

    Cedar Key was decked out by the people with care;

    Already by airboat, Santa Clam had been there.

    The pelicans were nestled all snug on the dock,

    Dreaming of sweet fishes and next year’s Sock Hop;

    The seagulls they were resting, not causing a flap,

    Planning their strategy for when snowbirds came back.

    When over the Gulf there arose such a clatter;

  • More than 40 participants from the Levy Association for Retarded Citizens Work Activity Center located in Otter Creek visited the Cedar Key Community Center last Thursday for a luncheon, informational presentations by local officials and a dance.

    “Mrs. Thelma McCain made us a fish dinner, grits, coleslaw, hush puppies and cake,” said Trainer Kathy Eschbach. McCain’s son Harold is a LARC participant. “Mrs. McCain fed everybody – anyone who walked through the front door,” Eschbach said.

  • Cedar Key artist and Florida native Mike Segal has been busy in 2009. His painting “July 4th Snoozer at Cedar Key,” was chosen to headline the upcoming Old Florida Celebration of the Arts and he received an honorarium to teach art to after school teachers in Alachua County.

  • Luz Kraujalis, known affectionately around Cedar Key as the “Tree Lady” has done it again. With the gracious donation of island landowner Tom Tonnilier of TNT Nursery, and three and a half days hard work by a handful of volunteers, Luz has seen to it that 62 young trees have been planted throughout downtown and the surrounding area.

    Tonnilier offered the sand live oak trees to the city as a gift, complete with delivery from his nursery in Alachua County.

  • The Friends and staff of the Lower Suwannee & Cedar Keys National Wildlife Refuges held an Open House last Saturday at the Suwannee Community Center in the town of Suwannee.

    Normally held at the Cedar Key NWR, this was the first time the annual event took place in Dixie County.

    “We wanted to give people over here an opportunity to get to know the Refuge,” said Refuge Manager John Kasbohm. “Based on the turnout we’ll probably rotate years – one year in Cedar Key, one here in Suwannee.”

  • Call it a working man’s respect for earning a living, call it a blue collar vacation, Jim Jackson of International Falls, Minnesota likes to spend vacations meeting new people and experiencing their professions. Jim spent the first six days of vacation hauling three poplar logs 1800 miles from the Canadian border to Cedar Key for a friend he made last year - local furniture maker Herman Wells.

    “I can‘t sit on the beach or anything like that,” Jim said of his taste in vacations.

  • The Cedar Key Historical Museum, housed in the Lutterloh Building located on the corner of 2nd and D street in Downtown Cedar Key, re-opened its doors last week after months of renovations that stripped the original structure down to little more than its front façade.

    The Cedar Key Historical Society’s museum will operate as a working museum for the next several weeks as volunteers continue to complete some of the exhibits, according to volunteer Elizabeth Ehrbar.

  • As the sun dries the final traces of moisture left from a damp night, 10 prescribed fire specialists make their way into the meeting room at the Cedar Key and Lower Suwannee National Wildlife Refuge headquarters for the morning briefing.

  • Alvin F. Oickle’s new book, The Cedar Keys Hurricane of 1896:Disaster at Dawn, gives a concise view of the late 19th century storm that changed lives and lifestyles on the islands. “(T)he disaster that befell the Cedar Keys helped it become a place apart from the mainland, both geographically and metaphysically,” Oickle contends.

  • Resident Willie Brown is making his own recycling initiative happen. He’s been visiting many Cedar Key businesses up to four times a week to pick up cardboard and transport it to the recycling trailer on 3rd Street.

    “My wife and I have always recycled our stuff when the trailer was out at the laundry mat,” he said. “We just sort of fell into this.”

    “Sometimes she helps me out, too,” Willie added.

  • Approximately 35 people gathered at the Library for the Garden Club's presentation of Ann Kamzelski's lecture, "Photographing Butterflies and Other Insects." Kamzelski's love of photography and nature was clearly evident in her presentation. This passion first began when she read a book on macro photography, after being inspired by her mother's photography of wildflowers. As an award-winning photographer, Kamzelski often does presentations pertaining to photography, some of which take place in Pennsylvania where she spends her summers.

  • The Cedar Key Woman’s Club will host a fashion show luncheon and shopping event Wednesday March 18 at 11:30 at the Community Center.

    “It’s turned out to be serious fashion with a comical side. Partly serious, partly fun,” said Ways and Means Chair Jane Moore who coordinates fundraising. “It isn’t just for women.” Everyone is invited to come and enjoy the fun for a good cause, she said.

  • David Beach was presented with a National Volunteer of the Year award at the annual convention of the American Water Works Association in San Diego last week for his work with Water for People.

    At the awards luncheon, Beach was lauded as "the most experienced volunteer, and best team leader" of the World Water Corps division of Water for People.

  • The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) kicked off Nature Coast Fishing for Youth, its first class of the summer, last week in Cedar Key.

    After an hour and a half bus ride, Taylor County kids scrambled off of the bus and under the open breezeway beneath the research facility’s offices and classroom.

    The class started off with a 10 minute fish matching game and a welcome from instructor and FWC Environmental Specialist Missy Jackson and her assistant Thomas Zimmerman.

  • Scott, Phil and Doug Little were in town for a double celebration this week, Scott’s 60th birthday, and most importantly, the 6th Biennial Little Fishing Competition.

    “We do this special thing,” said Doug, who hosts the competition at his home where the Old Ice-house used to be located. “This is our sixth time. We do it every other year.”

  • Lillian Kathleen Bishop Baker, known simply as “Great” by her many descendents, celebrated her 85th birthday last weekend, surrounded by generations of family at the Cedar Key City Park.

    Kathleen greeted well-wishers sporting a name tag that read, “Great.”

    “All the grandchildren call her that,” said her daughter Rita Bishop. “Great” seems an appropriate word to describe the octogenarian: great grandmother Kathleen is the matriarch of a great big family that traces its ties to Cedar Key for a great many generations.