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Today's Opinions

  • Sharks have returned to Cedar Key

    The water temperatures have slipped into the low seventies this past week and with the warmer temps more species have returned. Spanish mackerel catches are more common each week, and several species of sharks have returned to our local waters. I would like to report one particular blacktip shark who is not observing the fifteen inch minimum on spotted seatrout as it ate two short trout within a few feet of my vessel last Thursday. Good luck digesting the leadhead jigs that were included in those meals.

  • Captain's Log for the week of 2-25-16

    What a beautiful time of the year! It is so exciting to see the farmers getting watermelon fields ready to plant, the red maple are showing off their spring colors by adding a striking crimson to the area forests, and the redbuds are blooming everywhere.

  • A heartfelt thank you

    On our kitchen counter, right next to the trusty and well used microwave is an angel figurine that simply says, "Heaven sends us special angels, we call them friends".

    My wife and I would like to thank all our friends that enjoyed a grouper dinner at Robinson's Seafood on Sunday, Jan. 31. The food and fellowship was as good as it gets.

    In addition to the dinner, numerous local businesses donated items from seven different captains 1/2 day fishing charters to airplane rides.

  • Captain's Log for the week of 2-18-16

    Good news this week for grouper fishermen. The FWC has announced that gag grouper season will start June 1 this year. Previously gag season started on July 1.

    Part of the thinking on this change was the amount of discard gag grouper caught by fishermen targeting red grouper during the closed gag season. Additionally, the minimum size limit for both gag and black grouper will be increased to a 24 inch minimum. The new size limit for the Gulf will now be the same as on the Atlantic side of the state.

  • Biological Station a part of community

    By Jack Payne

    jackpayne@ufl.edu

    The Nature Coast is a paradise for scientists because it poses so many fascinating riddles: What happened to the birds on Seahorse Key? Can we raise Sunray Venus clams? How does swimming with humans affect manatees? Could the Gulf oil spill affect the fishing for spotted seatrout?

  • Good deed in the Refuge

    The graffiti that detracted from the beautiful refuge vistas on the Dixie Mainline bridge over Sanders creek in the Lower Suwannee Refuge, was recently whitewashed over by an anonymous good citizen.

    The Friends of the Refuge group and Refuge staff extend a heartfelt thank you to those good folks. We can all pitch in to help the refuges manage, protect, and preserve these natural communities for all wildlife while providing for quality outdoor recreational experiences for all of us.

  • Lukens Tract poses dilemma

    Four years ago when the Suwannee River Water Management District was buying the Lukens Tract to prevent it from being developed and to preserve the area’s pristine waters for aquaculture, it cut out 20 acres that had once been home to a dump.

    It’s understandable that the water district did not want to buy into a problem.

    But the water district finds itself snagged in another problem.

  • To the Levy County 4-H Family

    I am retiring as County Extension Director and 4-H Agent after 38-plus years of service to the University of Florida and a total of 42 years with USDA. My official retirement date is Jan. 31.

    I have been planning retirement for well over a year but more definitely in the last 2 months. I officially announced it to the University and to the County on Jan. 15.