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Columns

  • The Reinvention of Fire

    A look at history shows us that our energy sources have never remained static, with renewables such as wind and solar widespread several times in the past millennia, only to be displaced by a glut of cheap fuel.  

    Some sources become obsolete as their time has passed; others are taken over by their competitors as we are seeing with oil and coal. 

     The U.S. stopped the direct use of coal and oil for transportation and buildings in the 1920s and 1960s, respectively.  

  • Social Security and Women’s Equality Day

    By Kay Louder

    Social Security District Manager, Gainesville

    August 26 is known as Women’s Equality Day.  On that date in 1920, the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution was signed, giving women the right to vote.

  • Yearling steers go swimming

    Back on the farm at Twentymile Bend things had settled down after a brush by a tropical wave that dumped 12 inches of rain on top of us. 

    But my father, as usual, was thinking up ways to keep my brother Jerry and me busy. We were dreading what he might come up with next, because on a farm there were so many dirty jobs available. 

    I had spent one summer building fence and didn't want to have that ever again. 

  • Conservation Corner: A personal connection with Florida’s water

    By Peggy Herrick

  • Ask a Lawyer: No concealed weapons where alcohol is served

    M. C. of Otter Creek writes, “I went to my favorite local bar the other night to have a few beers and shoot some pool. This one guy who drank too much got a little mean after I beat him for the fifth time and I thought he was going to come after me with his cue stick. I’ve got a concealed weapon permit and I carry a gun wherever I go as a general rule, so I showed him my gun and warned him. Next thing I know, I get thrown out of the bar and the owner tells me I’m lucky he didn’t call the police. Can he do that?

  • Life’s most important ingredient: water

    In the last Conservation Corner titled “A Sustainable Model”, there was laid out a concept to compost the yard waste, dredge spoils and food waste. Upon further research, that concept is just not going to work for Cedar Key for two main reasons.
    First, there is the problem of scale. Our island’s dozen or so restaurants do not produce enough food waste to make the composting of that waste financially feasible. Also, the DEP regulations are intended for much larger operations then what the island’s needs are.

  • Do I have to pay $21,000 for a Medivac ride?

    J.M. of Morriston asks, “My husband, who is in his mid-fifties, had a serious medical incident occur several months ago which required me to call for emergency assistance. When the EMT’s arrived, my husband was unconscious. The EMT’s called for a helicopter but by the time the helicopter got there he had regained consciousness and was able to talk without difficulty. He didn’t think he needed to go in the helicopter to the hospital but they insisted he should do so, especially since it was on its way. The flight to the hospital took less than an hour.

  • Composting facility: A sustainable model

    What exactly does sustainable mean? A definition of sustainable is:  capable of being maintained at a steady level without exhausting natural resources or causing severe ecological damage. It encompasses the concept of stewardship and responsible management of resources.

  • Today in Levy County History: Vanishing churches

    In the wooded farmlands west of Williston stands, neglected and forgotten, an abandoned country church. Like a monument to the county’s rich historical past, this church is a silent sentinel and reminder of when our churches were the heart of community life.
    In days gone by, the tiny church houses were the center of life and death, where revivals, baptisms, weddings, Sunday school classes and funerals were held. But all country churches had a common thread, a warm homey feeling about them.

  • Cedar Key: food for thought

    By Eileen Bowers
    I was settin’ at this restaurant
    When the waiter came up and said, “What do you want?”
    I looked at the menu — it looked so nice.
    Till he said, “Let me give you some advice.”
    He said, “Spaghetti and potatoes got too much starch,
    Pork chops and sausage are bad for your heart.
    There’s hormones in chicken and beef and veal,
    Bowl of ravioli is a dead man’s meal.
    Bread’s got preservatives, there’s nitrates in ham,