.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Columns

  • Ya learn somethin’ everyday

    By Bev Ringenburg

    Over the past month I’ve pretty much been confined to the couch because of foot surgery, which means I’ve had a bit more time to do some channel surfing and finally learned how to watch programs “On Demand” (I know, I’m way behind the times).  What I found was the Documentary Channel and what I watched were two pretty interesting documentary films called “Tapped” (produced in 2009) and “Bag-It” (produced in 2010).

  • All I Ever Wanted To Be Was A Cowboy By Bill Roberts

    Back in the early 1960s, I was living in the Ocala National Forest in an area between the Oklawaha River and the St. Johns. My great-grandfather, Anderson Roberts homesteaded here when Florida was still just a territory.

  • Social Security Questions and Answers

     By Kay Louder

  • A 4-inch knife is a concealed weapon

    K. M. of Old Town writes, “I’ve got a question…last month you wrote about taking a gun into a bar being illegal, but taking a gun into a restaurant wasn’t, if you have a concealed weapon permit. What about a knife? What’s the rule there?


    Dear K. M.

  • The Reinvention of Fire

    A look at history shows us that our energy sources have never remained static, with renewables such as wind and solar widespread several times in the past millennia, only to be displaced by a glut of cheap fuel.  

    Some sources become obsolete as their time has passed; others are taken over by their competitors as we are seeing with oil and coal. 

     The U.S. stopped the direct use of coal and oil for transportation and buildings in the 1920s and 1960s, respectively.  

  • Social Security and Women’s Equality Day

    By Kay Louder

    Social Security District Manager, Gainesville

    August 26 is known as Women’s Equality Day.  On that date in 1920, the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution was signed, giving women the right to vote.

  • Yearling steers go swimming

    Back on the farm at Twentymile Bend things had settled down after a brush by a tropical wave that dumped 12 inches of rain on top of us. 

    But my father, as usual, was thinking up ways to keep my brother Jerry and me busy. We were dreading what he might come up with next, because on a farm there were so many dirty jobs available. 

    I had spent one summer building fence and didn't want to have that ever again. 

  • Conservation Corner: A personal connection with Florida’s water

    By Peggy Herrick

  • Ask a Lawyer: No concealed weapons where alcohol is served

    M. C. of Otter Creek writes, “I went to my favorite local bar the other night to have a few beers and shoot some pool. This one guy who drank too much got a little mean after I beat him for the fifth time and I thought he was going to come after me with his cue stick. I’ve got a concealed weapon permit and I carry a gun wherever I go as a general rule, so I showed him my gun and warned him. Next thing I know, I get thrown out of the bar and the owner tells me I’m lucky he didn’t call the police. Can he do that?

  • Life’s most important ingredient: water

    In the last Conservation Corner titled “A Sustainable Model”, there was laid out a concept to compost the yard waste, dredge spoils and food waste. Upon further research, that concept is just not going to work for Cedar Key for two main reasons.
    First, there is the problem of scale. Our island’s dozen or so restaurants do not produce enough food waste to make the composting of that waste financially feasible. Also, the DEP regulations are intended for much larger operations then what the island’s needs are.