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Today's News

  • Great Suwannee River Cleanup is Dec. 6

    The Great Suwannee River Clean-up, initiated and coordinated by Current Problems Executive Director Fritzi Olson, is nearing the end of the historic river.

  • $12.1 million in restoration funds sought for Levy, Dixie

    Levy and Dixie counties are listed among the 10 major watershed projects the state is seeking Gulf Coast restoration funds for, according to officials Thursday.
    The projects, meant to redress environmental and economic harm done during the 2010 BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill, were selected as the result of numerous stakeholder meetings and more than 1,200 online project submissions to the Florida Department of Environmental Protection.

  • Cell phone use cited in accident

    Staff Report
    A driver's cell phone use was cited as the cause of a chain-reaction three-vehicle collision at a construction zone on State Road 24 on Wednesday afternoon that left one person injured and blocked traffic for two hours, according to a Florida Highway Patrol press release.

  • $12.1 million in oil spill restoration funds sought for Levy and Dixie

    Levy and Dixie counties are listed among the 10 major watershed projects the state is seeking Gulf Coast restoration funds for, according to officials Thursday.
    The projects, meant to redress environmental and economic harm done during the 2010 BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill, were selected as the result of numerous stakeholder meetings and more than 1,200 online project submissions to the Florida Department of Environmental Protection.

  • Shark News - Week of 11-20-14

    Junior class
    Pie Auction reminder

     
    By Emily Colson
    Shark Correspondent
    Fall is the season of giving – pie!
    Come join the junior class in the Cedar Key School Auditorium on Monday, Nov. 24, for the 2014 Pie Auction. The doors will open at 5:30 p.m. and the auction begins at 6 p.m.
     This is the 22nd year that pies have been auctioned off to help the junior class pay for the annual prom and the junior-senior banquet.
     Bring your best baked goods – and your wallets!

  • 'Tin canners' open house beginning of December

    Tin Can Tourists will turn out in droves at Sunset Isle RV Park and Motel at the beginning of December.
    In years past, “tin canners,” as they call themselves, have come from as far away as New York, Michigan and Wisconsin to camp and show off their vintage RVs that span several decades.
    Most have been restored or are in the process of being restored, said Bruce Wilson, co-owner of Ada Blue Cafe, located near the RV park.

  • Community Calendar (week of 11-20-2014)

    Month of November

    Artist of the Month
    The Cedar Keyhole’s Artist of the Month for November is Patti Fox. Fox is a potter whose work is very organic. She mostly hand-builds her pottery using an iron-rich clay and impressing designs into the wet clay. She leaves the pieces unglazed, resulting in a rich, high-fired red oxide color and a very tactile surface. Fox creates a wide range of ceramic items using this technique.

  • Artists recognized

    Two local artists, Peter Klocksien and Russ Raethka, are  featured at the Cedar Key Arts Center this month. Please take a look at Klocksien’s collection of local art. In addition, Russ Raethka, of Chiefland, is featured in the Member’s Art Gallery with his paintings of local fish. This display will be open to the public from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. every day until Dec. 8. All items are for sale. The Cedar Key Arts Center is a non-profit organization whose goal is to educate and nurture local artists. The Arts Center is located at 457 Second Street.

  • Refuge 'belfry' to benefit Brazilian bats

    Thirteen years ago, near the headquarters of the Lower Suwannee National Wildlife Refuge, staff built the refuge’s first bat house. Now, a new one has been built with the hopes that the Brazilian free tail bats that have occupied the first will move — before the old one collapses.
    Brazilian free tail bats, unlike some of their solitary cousins, are colonial, cramming into a space sometimes 40,000 to 60,000 bats strong.

  • Study sheds light on red tide blooms

    Red tide is a natural occurrence, known to predate European settlement. But new research is further supporting the notion that humans, while not the cause of the blooms, can be a contributing factor in sustaining the harmful algae that, year by year, appears to becoming more of an issue.
    Research from five years of study shows that nutrient pollution is a contributing factor in the proliferation of the highly adaptable red tide organism Karenia brevis, according to the Mote Marine Laboratory and Aquarium.