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Today's News

  • Cedar Key Water and Sewer District Update

     New Commissioner Selected

  • I’m going green - one step at a time

    A few months ago you may have notice that I went green – in a big way.

    I traded my cash for a clunker. That’s right, it’s a reused vehicle – 11 years old. It’s a pretty safe green van, too. I found that out when an even bigger clunker – driven by a pajama-clad teenager – rammed into my previous van of the same model, disrupting my plans to drive that beloved vehicle beyond the 300,000 mile mark (I only had about 22,000 to go). She took that clunker off the road without any help from the government.

  • Fishing Report - Aug. 27

    Hello to all our Cedar Key guests and to our locals, howdy.

    This week I would like to start by saying thanks to everyone for all the kind words about the fishing reports. Anyone that knows me knows I'm no ritter (haha) but I do love to talk fishin.

  • Conservation Corner - Q & A about Solar Energy

    Over the last two months we have shared background information about solar energy, solar water heaters and solar electric panels.  Now we’d like to answer some of your questions.

     

    Question 1:  OK, so I’m convinced I would be doing something good for the environment in the long run, but how much is it going to cost me now?

  • Capt. Danny's Fishing report - Sept. 3

    Hey there everyone. Man, what a week I had the other side of fishing.

    Fishing reports are great. And fishing shows are really neat, very informative and entertaining –a lot like fishin’ reports should be.

    But there is a lot of drama behind it all. This week I was able to hit the water four days – three Cedar Key trips an’ one day in Steinhatchee. All days were great fishing (of course) but I had both my color GPS units go back to lowrance, my trolling motor breaks, an’ my 225 mercury blows a head gasket.

  • Owls work the night shift

    The Friends and staff of the Lower Suwannee & Cedar Keys National Wildlife Refuges held an Open House last Saturday at the Suwannee Community Center in the town of Suwannee.

    Normally held at the Cedar Key NWR, this was the first time the annual event took place in Dixie County.

    “We wanted to give people over here an opportunity to get to know the Refuge,” said Refuge Manager John Kasbohm. “Based on the turnout we’ll probably rotate years – one year in Cedar Key, one here in Suwannee.”

  • Canadian Vacationer brings logs to CK furniture maker

    Call it a working man’s respect for earning a living, call it a blue collar vacation, Jim Jackson of International Falls, Minnesota likes to spend vacations meeting new people and experiencing their professions. Jim spent the first six days of vacation hauling three poplar logs 1800 miles from the Canadian border to Cedar Key for a friend he made last year - local furniture maker Herman Wells.

    “I can‘t sit on the beach or anything like that,” Jim said of his taste in vacations.

  • Cedar Key Historical Museum is open again

    The Cedar Key Historical Museum, housed in the Lutterloh Building located on the corner of 2nd and D street in Downtown Cedar Key, re-opened its doors last week after months of renovations that stripped the original structure down to little more than its front façade.

    The Cedar Key Historical Society’s museum will operate as a working museum for the next several weeks as volunteers continue to complete some of the exhibits, according to volunteer Elizabeth Ehrbar.

  • Fire specialists burn to create historical habitat

    As the sun dries the final traces of moisture left from a damp night, 10 prescribed fire specialists make their way into the meeting room at the Cedar Key and Lower Suwannee National Wildlife Refuge headquarters for the morning briefing.

  • Author releases book on Hurricane of 1896

    Alvin F. Oickle’s new book, The Cedar Keys Hurricane of 1896:Disaster at Dawn, gives a concise view of the late 19th century storm that changed lives and lifestyles on the islands. “(T)he disaster that befell the Cedar Keys helped it become a place apart from the mainland, both geographically and metaphysically,” Oickle contends.