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Today's News

  • Springs project aims at manatee conservation

        Fanning Springs State Park will be getting a small makeover in a couple of years that could make it easier for wildlife to use the spring, according to representatives from Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission.

        “It’s a small project, but we’re really excited about getting this done,” FWC biologist Ron Mezich said Thursday at the quarterly meeting of the Fanning and Manatee Springs Working Group at Fanning Springs City Hall.

  • County: No raise for 4th year

    County employees will go a fourth year without a pay increase under a budget approved last week by the Levy County Board of Commissioners.

    The commission voted 2-3 on a motion to grant the pay raise by Commissioner Danny Stevens of Williston and seconded by Commissioner Lilly Rooks of Rosewood during an evening meeting on Thursday, Sept. 9, that was attended by about 25 county workers and their spouses.

    Dissenting in the vote were Commission Chair Nancy Bell of Chiefland, Commissioner Chad Johnson of Chiefland and Commissioner Marsha Drew of Yankeetown.

  • Keyhole Gallery’s Artist of the Month

    The Cedar Keyhole Gallery is proud to announce Artist of the Month for September 2010 is Steve Bloom.

  • Confederate re-enactors remember soldier

    A memorial service for James Simon Bailey, 1839 - 1908, Company G, 60th Regiment, Georgia CSA on Sunday, Oct. 3, at 3 p.m. at Jennings Lake Cemetery.

    The children of James S Bailey are Jane Ann Bailey Knighten, Jefferson Timothy Bailey, Larcinia Bailey Suggs, Mary Penina Bailey Nash, Ella Bailey Cooper Nash Knighten, James Wiley Bailey, William Redmond Bailey, Silvia Bailey Moore, Ashley Bailey, John Gordon Bailey, Sidney Newton Bailey, Eunice Bailey Polk, Pernion Bailey, Oliver W Bailey, Ruby Rachel Bailey Rose, Jennings Bryan Bailey and Frances Beatrice Bailey Rivers.

  • School Board overturns automatic pay increases

    The School Board of Levy County unanimously voted on Tuesday to change the language of the school district’s contract with the Levy County Education Association, altering it so that automatic salary step increases for teachers and employees will now be negotiated annually.

    Both sides argued their cases before the board during an impasse hearing at the School Board’s offices in Bronson. The decision alters an agreement that has been in place for 30 years in the school district.

  • Women have place close to home for care

    Women in Levy County who dread that long ride to Gainesville for health care can save on the wear, tear and gas bill by getting care in Chiefland at a new health clinic that specializes in providing examinations, testing and treatment.

    "My slogan is health care for  women by a woman because a lot of women don't want to be seen by a man," said Nurse Practitioner Lauren Williams.

    She has opened A Woman's Place at 1415 N.W. 23rd Avenue in Chiefland. Williams is a board certified nurse practitioner.

  • Budget Workshop Round-up: The haves and the have-nots

    For the past couple of weeks, the City Commissioners have met several times, trying to narrow the gap between what they want and what they can afford.

    As of Tuesday night, the gap was eliminated completely though more than one commissioner was not pleased with the outcome.

    Commissioner Heath Davis has been conspicuously missing from the workshops since he walked out on the Sept. 8 workshop, but that has not stopped the other Commissioners from moving on with their work.

    Some of the highlights of the workshops include:

  • Ride to Provide nets $13,600; more than 250 bike 63 miles

    A convoy of about 250 motorcycles of every make, model and year snaked its way along about 63 miles of scenic Levy County highways and back roads Saturday as part of the fifth annual Ride to Provide.

    The ride, led by a patrol car from the Levy County Sheriff’s Office, started at Bronson High School and ended in Otter Creek on the campus of the Levy Association for Retarded Citizens.  Members of the local law enforcement community organized the annual event, which helps fund LARC, in 2006.

  • Cedar Key joins world in coastal cleanup

    Trash is one of the most widespread pollution problems threatening our ocean and waterways and it’s entirely preventable. Marine debris is more than an eyesore. It is a threat to marine wildlife and ecosystems; and undermines tourism and economic activity.

    Our ocean is stressed from disasters like the BP Deepwater Horizon spill, pollution, overfishing, habitat loss, rising sea temperatures and acidification. Keeping our ocean free from trash is one of the easiest ways we can make the ocean more resilient to these combined threats.

  • CK workers get to keep pay, vacations Commission trims budget

        The Cedar Key City Commission started its Sept. 8 workshop with a $40,587 shortfall in next year’s proposed budget. By the end of the meeting they had shaved off all but $10,602 of the deficit.

        At the same time, the board avoided cutting city workers’ pay and vacation benefits, while sacrificing their own life and dental insurance coverage. That move alone by the commission saved about $3,700 per year. If a commissioner wants the insurance coverage they will have to pay it out of their own pocket.