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Today's News

  • Mighty Youth Conservation Corps breaks records

    Summer work begins early in the morning for the Youth Conservation Corps (YCC) students at the Lower Suwannee National Wildlife Refuge. Before the sun makes it over the long leaf pines in the forest, the ice is already in the cooler. Equipment for the day’s work is loaded into the truck along with other essentials, but nothing that would attract bats.

  • Narconon is here to help

    Narconon would like to remind families that the use of addicting drugs is on the rise and to take steps to protect your family from drug use. If you know anyone who is struggling with drug addiction get them the help they need.

    Call for a free brochure on the signs of addiction for all drugs. Narconon also offers free screenings and referrals. 800-431-1754 or www.drugabusesolution.com.

  • Florida landmark relocated

    The Cape San Blas lighthouse, located 12-miles south of the city of Port St. Joe on the south point of the St. Joseph Peninsula, is no stranger to the effects of erosion. First lighted in 1849, the lighthouse fell down during a gale in 1851. The light was rebuilt in 1856 but destroyed two months later.

  • Community Calendar for the week of July 24

    Summer arts program

    The Keyhole Gallery is hosting summer art programs for kids this summer. Teen camps will be in the mornings, and children's programs will be in the afternoons. There is a scholarship program for families that might have trouble financially.

    Registration forms are available in the summer newsletter, at the Keyhole and the Cedar Key School.

    For more information, contact Amy Gernhardt at 352-215-2096, amyjojones4@gmail.com.

    Vacation Bible school

  • Property taxes could go down this year

    Property values are up a smidgen this year, so the Levy County Commission will be giving property owners a break, tentatively dropping the millage from last year’s 8.3307 to 8.2741 mills.

    The unanimous action by the commissioners came at the end of a budget workshop on Tuesday, said County Coordinator Fred Moody. Property taxes are just one part of the budget picture with grants, fees, penalties and interest on due bills and assessments also being collected. The preliminary county budget is estimated to have $61,953,536 in revenue in the fiscal year beginning Oct. 1.

  • 'Dear Gov. Scott, CK oysters need help, too'

    While Cedar Key is famed for its sweet, succulent clams, it was the area’s fat, salty oysters that once ruled the shellfish business.

    But they have fallen on hard times, much like their neighbors to the north in Apalachicola Bay and the local waters were depleted by a drought of several years that made the area waters too salty for oysters to thrive and made them vulnerable to disease.

  • Fishing tournament holds third event at CK

    The third event of the Team SeaTow Elite Redfish Challenge 2014, organized by Capt'n Danny Allen,  is in Cedar Key this weekend. The event is expected to bring in a large number of anglers and their boats from around the state.
    Allen, the Cedar Key Beacon's fishing columnist, is holding the event for the second time. The final event in the series will be Aug. 23 in Steinhatchee. Events have already been held at Steinhatchee and Homosassa.  

  • Community Calendar (week of 7-10-14)

    Summer arts program
    The Keyhole Gallery is hosting summer art programs for kids this summer. Teen camps will be in the mornings, and children's programs will be in the afternoons. There is a scholarship program for families that might have trouble financially.
    Registration forms are available in the summer newsletter, at the Keyhole and the Cedar Key School.
    For more information, contact Amy Gernhardt at 352-215-2096, amyjojones4@gmail.com.

    Vacation Bible school

  • The Fourth in Cedar Key
  • Gene Hodges dead at 77

    Cedar Key Mayor Eugene “Gene” Hodges, born into a politically connected family, was the heir to that way of knowing how to get things done for the island community and district that he represented in the Florida House from 1972 to 1988.
    Hodges'  father was a state senator from 1952-62, Senate President and later a lobbyist.
    The son, a lifelong Democrat, made his mark in politics by being smart and likable. He used his quick wit the way a carpenter uses a wood plane — smoothing and finely shaping the final debate.