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Today's News

  • $12.1 million in restoration funds sought for Levy, Dixie

    Levy and Dixie counties are listed among the 10 major watershed projects the state is seeking Gulf Coast restoration funds for, according to officials Thursday.
    The projects, meant to redress environmental and economic harm done during the 2010 BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill, were selected as the result of numerous stakeholder meetings and more than 1,200 online project submissions to the Florida Department of Environmental Protection.

  • Tin Can Tourists return

     Like the swallows to Capistrano, every year the Tin Can Tourists return to Cedar Key for their annual meet up and to show off their classic recreational vehicles and the vehicles that haul them around the state and nation. 

    There were several dozen at Sunset Isle RV Park and they threw open the door on their ride and RVs for the public on Saturday, Dec. 6. 

  • Local oystermen taking action

    Local oystermen in Levy and Dixie counties are unhappy about the state of their industry and they are uniting in an effort to draw attention to their plight.
    The oyster collapse came in 2012, the height of a number of years of drought. And while the waters are getting better with the flush of rainfall in 2013 and this year, the recovery will need some help.
    Nature Coast oyster beds need to be reseeded.

  • Study sheds light on red tide blooms

    Red tide is a natural occurrence, known to predate European settlement. But new research is further supporting the notion that humans, while not the cause of the blooms, can be a contributing factor in sustaining the harmful algae that, year by year, appears to becoming more of an issue.
    Research from five years of study shows that nutrient pollution is a contributing factor in the proliferation of the highly adaptable red tide organism Karenia brevis, according to the Mote Marine Laboratory and Aquarium.

  • Community calendar week of 12-18-14

     Month of December 

     

    Artist of the Month

    The Cedar Keyhole’s Artist of the Month for December is Harry MacLeod. MacLeod uses a scroll saw to create interesting and fun works in wood,  which include puzzles, small sculptures, animals, intricate scenes, tree ornaments and signs for the home. His works are primarily left in the natural wood state, but some are colorfully painted. 

  • Playin' hide-and-seek on the water

     Hey, everyone, sorry I missed some weeks–been a little busy with kids' ball games and praying for the wind to not blow the water out.

    ¥ou get it, situational things of that sort. Oh also it's hard to type with your fingers crossed that the gators will win. Ha ha yeah white knuckles and all, it didn’t help. 

    As far as the fishing goes, it’s been pretty consistent with a hot spot here and there when the weather settles–the usual for this time of year. 

  • Community calendar week of 12-11-14

     Month of December 

     

    Artist of the Month

    The Cedar Keyhole’s Artist of the Month for December is Harry MacLeod. MacLeod uses a scroll saw to create interesting and fun works in wood,  which include puzzles, small sculptures, animals, intricate scenes, tree ornaments and signs for the home. His works are primarily left in the natural wood state, but some are colorfully painted. 

  • State OKs Chiefland hospital certificate

    After more than a decade of disappointment, the development of a hospital in Chiefland seems to be inching closer to becoming a reality.
    Friday, the Florida Agency for Healthcare Administration announced that it has granted Ameris Health Systems the certificate of need (CON) necessary to get the $45 million project rolling.
    "It's great news. We're really excited," Ameris senior vice president for business development Frank Schupp said in a phone interview.

  • Only one veterinarian applies for county opening

    Seven people have applied for the county's new grants coordinator job, but it was the veterinarian's job – which attracted only one applicant –that got the most attention from those attending the Levy County Commission.

  • Only one veterinarian applies for county opening

    Seven people have applied for the county's new grants coordinator job, but it was the veterinarian's job – which attracted only one applicant –that got the most attention from those attending the Levy County Commission.