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Today's News

  • Officials: Cedar Key safe from red tide

    A red tide bloom in the Gulf has killed thousands of fish in the last two weeks, according to state officials, but Cedar Key is proving unaffected.
    Leslie Sturmer, a University of Florida aquaculture specialist in Cedar Key, said Monday that test samples for red tide toxins in the area’s shellfish have yielded good results.
    “There are zero cells in the samples, as we suspected,” she said, adding that 5,000 or more cells per liter in a sample would cause shellfish operations to close shop.

  • County, congressional candidates speak out at forum

    If anyone came expecting fireworks at the candidates forum hosted by VFW Post 5625 and the Chiefland Citizen, they were likely to come away disappointed. But hopefully they came away better informed.
    The event on Friday Aug. 1, at the VFW Post in south Chiefland, likely the only candidates forum being held before the Aug. 26 primary, drew about 30 people for the steak dinner beforehand, and candidates and their surrogates from the County Commission District 2 and District 4 races and the Congressional District 3 race.

    Attending from:

  • Two arrested in torturing tortoises

    Officers with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) arrested two Clay County teenagers Friday morning on charges of torturing a gopher tortoise.
    Danielle Susan Dionne, 15, and Jennifer Emoke Greene, 18, have been arrested on charges of felony cruelty to animals, a third-degree felony, and taking, harassing, harming or killing a gopher tortoise, a second-degree misdemeanor.

  • Early voting under way

    Supervisor of Elections Tammy Jones opened early voting on Monday for the Aug. 26 primary election at her office at 421 S. Court St., next to the county courthouse, in Bronson.
    Balloting hours are 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. through Saturday, Aug. 23.
    All voters will be voting in the 8th Judicial Circuit judgeship for Group 12 where incumbent William E. Davis faces challenger William Falik.

  • Cedar Key aquaculture to plot future

    The Cedar Key Aquaculture Association invites the clam aquaculture community to participate in developing an industry action plan for marketing, research and marine debris as part of its annual general membership meeting.

  • Officials to hold strict standards on municipal ALS

    Officials are still attempting to hammer out the details that would allow Chiefland Fire Rescue to be certified in non-transport advanced life support (ALS), but there’s still concern over cost and whether or not strict standards can be met.

  • Mighty Youth Conservation Corps breaks records

    Summer work begins early in the morning for the Youth Conservation Corps (YCC) students at the Lower Suwannee National Wildlife Refuge. Before the sun makes it over the long leaf pines in the forest, the ice is already in the cooler. Equipment for the day’s work is loaded into the truck along with other essentials, but nothing that would attract bats.

  • Chiefland hospital developers seek new certificate from state

    Plans for a hospital in Chiefland are back on the table.
    Frank Schupp, vice president of business development with Ameris Health, the company that would manage the proposed hospital, said Monday that his company is seeking a new Certificate of Need from the state.
    Talks of a hospital have been ongoing for years, but funding for the project, despite the need in the area, was always in short supply. Ameris lost its last Certificate of Need last year after not being able to move forward with development.

  • Smithsonian exhibit showcasing the American workforce coming to Cedar Key

    What would life be like without teachers, doctors or firefighters? Everyday, Americans are hard at work on farms, factories, in homes, or at desks keeping our communities thriving. The Cedar Key Historical Museum, in cooperation with the Florida Humanities Council, will explore the professions and the people that sustain American society when it hosts, “The Way We Worked,” a Smithsonian Institution traveling exhibition. “The Way We Worked” will be on view from Saturday, Sept. 13, through Sunday, Oct. 24.

  • Property taxes could go down this year

    Property values are up a smidgen this year, so the Levy County Commission will be giving property owners a break, tentatively dropping the millage from last year’s 8.3307 to 8.2741 mills.

    The unanimous action by the commissioners came at the end of a budget workshop on Tuesday, said County Coordinator Fred Moody. Property taxes are just one part of the budget picture with grants, fees, penalties and interest on due bills and assessments also being collected. The preliminary county budget is estimated to have $61,953,536 in revenue in the fiscal year beginning Oct. 1.