Today's News

  • Keep an eye on new Tropical Depression 9

    Levy County Emergency Management sent out a notice on Sunday that it is not too early to start keeping an eye on Invest 99L and check your hurricane supplies and plans because it has the potential to develop as it moves into the Gulf of Mexico. The notice is not to alarm residents but to make sure they are cognizant of what is happening in the Gulf. 

  • Dickey looks forward to leading boys hoops program at Cedar Key

    Vance Dickey had only recently arrived in Cedar Key to teach Phys Ed and head the boys hoops team, but he was already knee-deep in the program’s history as he cleaned out his new office.

    “Man, there are years and years – I shouldn’t say years, because that’s misleading – there are decades worth of stuff here,” Dickey says by phone while taking a break from the cleaning. “I’m picking up uniforms I’m thinking are from the 1960s or 70s, and they’re falling apart.”

  • Captain's Log: Tags tell a story

    It is interesting to hear the rumors about the UF trout tag reward research. I have had people tell me at the boat ramp that over 100 trout tags have been turned in, and there are a thousand more tags out there … wow, I think I need to help set the record straight.

    I talked to Mike Allen, director of the Nature Coast Biological Station, and he shared some data with me. The purpose of the tagging project is centered around mortality rates of catch and release of spotted seatrout.

  • Early voting under way

    Early voting started on Monday and continues every day through Aug. 27 from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. at the Supervisor of Elections Office at 421 S. Court St., Bronson.

    And to make voting easy, Supervisor of Elections Tammy Jones has turned the back room of her office into a roomy polling station with parking right outside the door. It could not be more convenient.

    As of Tuesday afternoon almost 200 people had cast their ballots in early voting. Another 1,786 voters has cast absentee ballots.

  • New parking for Cedar Key


    The City of Cedar Key will gain new parking for golf carts and motorcycles on Dock Street courtesy of Levy County, which owns land right where Dock Street meets the City Marina and Boat Launch area.

    In its meeting Tuesday the Levy County Commission decided it did not want to sell the land outright, but would allow the city to use it. The commission agreed in concept and it is up to the city to draft the agreement.

  • Shell Mound road to be done

    That worn out, way too narrow strip of asphalt known as Shell Mound Road will finally be widened to 22 feet, have guardrails in a vulnerable spot and be repaved, thanks to the county recreation impact fee fund.

  • Slemp ready to lead Cedar Key School

    Joshua Slemp has been a fixture of Levy County’s school system at several levels, from teacher to project manager to assistant principal.

    His journey has led him to his latest stop, Cedar Key School, where the 39-year-old is in his first job as principal.

    It’s a culmination of the various roles he’s served, and a place where that experience figures to come in handy at the K-12 school, which has about 250 students.

  • TRIM notices go in the mail Aug. 19

    The TRIM ― Truth in Millage ― notices are at the printer and will be dropped in the mail to property owners on Aug. 19 according to the Levy County Property Appraiser's Office.

    Oz Barker, Levy County Property Appraiser, said there is noting new in the TRIM notices this year, except the taxes being levied by taxing authorities.

  • UF/IFAS scientist digging into artichokes as alternative crop

    While California grows 99 percent of the nation’s artichokes, the edible plant high in antioxidants might get a chance to grow in the Sunshine State, if a University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences researcher gets good results from his field trials.

    Artichokes flourish in a cool environment, so a warm winter might present an obstacle for Florida growers. Artichokes generally require at least 250 cumulative hours below 50 degrees for bud formation. Therefore, flowering must be artificially induced to produce artichokes in Florida.

  • Captain's Log: Regulations have changed over the years

    In the past couple of years, our fishing regulations have seen a lot of changes. It is of course the anglers responsibility to keep up to date on the changes, or suffer the wrath of some expensive fines. All of these regulations of course are to keep our resource sustainable, which I fully endorse.