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Local News

  • Community generous during service week

    The Cedar Key Lions Club recently completed a Worldwide Week of Service, joining with Lions around the globe for this community service project. In early January, Lion volunteers braved raw winds and cold temperatures to collect donations of food and clothing in front of the Cedar Key Post Office. At the same time, Lion volunteers coordinated donations at City Hall, Cedar Key Episcopal Church, Cedar Key Methodist Church and Cedar Key Baptist Church. The Lions served residents of Cedar Key well. The local results were impressive.

  • Marine Science Symposium honors video stars

    Dr. Jack Payne, second from left, senior vice president for agriculture and natural resources at the University of Florida, honored the stars of "Gator Good: The Cedar Keys Story."

    From left to right are Leslie Sturmer, UF IFAS Agent; Payne, Heath Davis, mayor and oysterman; Shawn Stephenson, clam farmer; Bobby Witt, clam farmer and Sue Colson, city commissioner and clam farmer. 

  • Artist of the Month Feb. 2016

    The Artist of the Month at the Cedar Keyhole in Cedar Key is Connie Stark, whose face jugs, mugs, toothbrush holders, shot glasses, sponge holders and thimbles delight collectors of all ages. Each face has a unique personality – whimsical, comical or a bit goofy, but always entertaining.

  • Learn about dinosaurs of the Suwannee River

     

    A talk by Savanna Barry, Travis Thomas at Cedar Key Public Library Feb. 13 at 10:30 a.m. will focus on

    Alligator Snapping Turtles (genus Macrochelys). They are large, aquatic turtles limited to river systems that drain into the Gulf of Mexico.

    New research used evidence from the fossil record, turtle morphology, and genetics to identify two new species of Alligator Snapping Turtle, one of which is only found in the Suwannee river drainage.

  • Good time was had at benefit dinner

    Robinson's Restaurant in Rosewood was closed Sunday but you would have hardly known it as folks stood in line out to the parking lot to buy grouper dinners for a fundraiser for charter Capt. Phil Muldrow. All the food and desserts were donated and several hundred folks turned out — including snowbirds from as far away as Ontario, Canada, Wyoming and West Virginia. 

  • The raccoons did it (maybe)

    On April 19, 2015, the thousands of nests on Seahorse Key were occupied and the sounds of birds filled the air. Those feeding their broods brought in fish, some of which drooped from nests to be devoured by the cottonmouths that live below.

    “They are very sloppy and they are a food source, a very large source of food for the cottonmouth which eats marine fish,” said Coleman M. Sheehy III, a researcher on the island since 2001. “The important thing is they eat the fish, not the birds.”

    On April 21 Seahorse Key was quiet. No birds.

  • The raccoons did it (maybe)

    On April 19, 2015, the thousands of nests on Seahorse Key were occupied and the sounds of birds filled the air. Those feeding their broods brought in fish, some of which drooped from nests to be devoured by the cottonmouths that live below.

    “They are very sloppy and they are a food source, a very large source of food for the cottonmouth which eats marine fish,” said Coleman M. Sheehy III, a researcher on the island since 2001. “The important thing is they eat the fish, not the birds.”

    On April 21 Seahorse Key was quiet. No birds.

  • Arts Center sponsors art-filled home tour, exhibit

    Cedar Key is known as a sleepy fishing village surrounded by gorgeous scenery and abundant wildlife. But just under this surface is a thriving art community. For years the island has been a magnet for artists who live there permanently or visit regularly and two decades ago the enclave of 700 permanent residents was endowed with an arts center which sponsors classes, exhibitions, a summer art camp for kids, and a juried arts festival each spring.

  • CK: important rest area for wintering birds

    By Karen Parker 

    Human “snow birds” aren’t the only birds visiting Cedar Key during the colder winter months.

    The area is used by more than 40 migratory bird species, and serves as the second largest overwintering site for the American oystercatcher throughout its range. American oystercatchers spend the summer months as far north as Maine and have been found overwintering in Cedar Key year after year.

  • North Florida Marine Science Symposium Jan. 28 and 29

    Join researchers, resource management agencies and students for the UF/IFAS 2016 North Florida Marine Science Symposium Jan. 28 and 29 in Cedar Key, FL at the Community Center. The event is open to the public on Thursday, Jan. 28, 2016 from 6:00 - 7:30 p.m. for the evening poster presentation and Friday, Jan. 29, 2016 at 9:00 a.m. for guest speaker, Dr. Michael Beck with the Nature Conservancy and University of California Santa Cruz. He will be delivering a presentation titled "Building Coastal Resilience for Climate Adaptation, Risk Reduction and Conservation".