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Local News

  • A bird in the hand is worth...

  • CK Woman’s Club installs (kind of) new officers

    The Cedar Key Woman’s Club held its Installation Dinner on March 28 at the Seabreeze Restaurant in Cedar Key.
    The theme of the event was “recycling”, and true to that theme, the club’s new officers are those that served in the past.
    Officers installed include: Jane Moore, president; Debbie Franks, first vice-president (not present), Joan Selby, second vice-president; Teri Brennan, secretary; Cindy Leiner, treasurer (not present); Judy Duvall, parliamentarian; and Eileen Senecal, corresponding secretary.

  • Shark News for April 5

    Cedar Key FFA off to OH

    By Sarah Bartholemy
    Shark Correspondent
    Cedar Key is on its way to the Ornamental Horticulture CDE in Mayo, Florida. The teams have been preparing for three months and all of their hard work will be put to use. Lauren Bartholemy, Laia Gore, Sarah Bartholemy, Taryn Epperson, Mikayla Pope, Jemima Cahours, MacKenzie Kirkbride, Ashlyn Allen, Taylor Davison, Nathaneal Brinkman and Brooke Allen will all be competing today.

  • UF embarks on Levy sea level study

    Researchers at the University of Florida say they want community input from residents of Levy County on the threat of rising seas.
    Last month, according to UF Department of Urban and Regional Planning professor Dr. Kathryn Frank, UF began a two-year project aimed at helping the county cope with the inevitability of rising seas due to climate change.
    ‘We’re still in the information gathering process,” Frank said about the project, which is funded by a Florida Sea Grant.

  • Cedar Key Lions recycle for sight

    By Rory Brennan
    Special to the Beacon
    As spring cleaning gets under way, the Cedar Key Lions are asking people to look through dresser drawers and closets for used eyeglasses and donate them to the Lions Recycle For Sight program.

  • Buster helps veterans

    Buster may look mean, but he’s “so humanlike” according to his companion, who did not wish to be the focus of this article. Buster was visiting Cedar Key during a stop on his human companion’s sailing trip.
    Buster has been made available to his companion through the efforts of two foundations, paws4people and paws4vets, that have been “training and pairing service dogs with veterans, active duty service members, children, seniors and individuals living with disabilities or serious illnesses” according to their website.

  • TDC will spare no money for CK billboard

    “Come to Cedar Key” is not a message motorists driving on Interstate-75 are likely to see in 2012.
    Not unless some entity other than the Levy County Tourist Development Council is willing to pay for it.
    Council members told a small group requesting $10,000 at the LCTDC’s March 29 meeting that there are no funds for such a project in the current year’s budget.

  • Four license-free fishing days begin April 7

    Grab your fishing rods and tackle box. It’s almost time – April 7 – to take advantage of the first of four license-free fishing days scheduled for this summer in Florida, according to Gov. Rick Scott.
    The days are perfect chances for parents, who don’t yet have a license, to take youth fishing, or for avid anglers to introduce a friend to the recreational pursuit without having to purchase a license.

  • Things are hopping in Cedar Key - and the fishing ain’t bad, either

    Hello again everybody, hope everyone enjoyed the weekend. Our lil’ town was pretty busy during the day with lots of folks out wandering, fishing, sightseeing and gift shopping.
    We also had some debating/politicking going on. All in all, it was great to see the town full. I don’t think the evenings were as awesome with lots of rain Saturday night, mainly.

  • 1830: first Florida census

    By Toni C. Collins
    Levy County Historian
    The Federal government has conducted a census or account of its population every year since 1790. In that year the census takers, who were U.S. Marshals on horseback, counted 3.9 million inhabitants.
    Why did the government undertake such a huge project? As America expanded, the nation’s interests grew more complex and the government needed to plan for that new growth.