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Local News

  • Red tide organism found in Cedar Key

    A dangerous toxin-producing organism known as Karenia brevis from a red tide bloom first spotted in the Gulf of Mexico near the end of July has made it to Cedar Key, according to officials.
    In early August, the bloom was 50 to 80 miles offshore, and testing for the organism, which can affect the nervous system of people and animals, confirmed that it had only reached areas near Pinellas County.
    But the bloom, over recent months, has migrated with the wind, coming as close to shore as 5 to 30 miles between Dixie and Pinellas counties.

  • Florida continues effort to control invasive lionfish

    State officials are cracking down on lionfish cultivation.
    The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation moved Wednesday to prohibit the harvest and possession of eggs (other than for destruction) from the fish and have made it illegal to intentionally breed the animals, which are recognized as an invasive species that  is bad for habitat and native Florida fish.

  • Pirate invasion this weekend

    Celebrate the past with historical re-enactors this weekend in Cedar Key. See how pirates lived on land when ashore. Watch the epic battle that is certain to be played out on the shores of Cedar Key. Learn from some of the finest re-enactors on the East Coast.

  • Brotherly advice
  • Property tax, assessment hearing tonight

    Folks who want to be heard on this year’s property tax and assessments bills will have their opportunity at 6 p.m. tonight (Thursday) when the Levy County Commission holds a public hearing at 6 p.m. in Courtroom A of the Levy County Courthouse.
    The purpose of tonight’s hearing is to determine the final assessments for emergency medical service, fire, solid waste and roads. At the end of the hearing the commission will vote on the final assessments.

  • MoMS, other activities, kick off

    The Smithsonian Institution's highly anticipated Museums on Main Street (MoMS) is set to debut this weekend in Cedar Key.
    Hosted by The Cedar Key Historical Society, MoMS has been made possible by the Florida Humanities Council.
    The physical exhibit, which is titled, "The Way We Worked," explores how work became a central element in American culture by tracing the many changes that affected the workforce and work environments over the past 150 years.

  • Shark News

    Lady Sharks battle hard against Dixie County High

    By Emily Colson
    Shark Correspondent
    On Thursday, Aug. 28, the Lady Sharks volleyball varsity team played against Dixie County High School. Although DCHS left with the win (8-25, 7-25 and 10-25), the Lady Sharks went home prepared to work on their skills in order to become a more competitive team this season.

  • Cedar Key shark abused — may get makeover

    Staff report

  • Every vote counts when only three determine winner

    It took a couple of hours on Thursday and all day Friday, but by the time the weekend started the Supervisor of Elections was able to announce that former District 4 Commissioner Lilly Rooks had won the Republican nomination by a three-vote margin.
    The final count: 1,728 votes for Rooks to 1,725 votes for incumbent Commissioner Ryan Bell of Chiefland. Rooks will face Democrat Jamie Griffin in the Nov. 4 general election.
    It was a sweet comeback for Rooks, defeating the man who unseated her four years ago, and after suffering two strokes earlier this year.  

  • Smithsonian exhibit opens next week on Saturday

    The Smithsonian Institution's highly anticipated Museums on Main Street (MoMS) is set to debut next week in Cedar Key.
    Hosted by The Cedar Key Historical Society, MoMS has been made possible by the Florida Humanities Council.
    The physical exhibit, which is titled, "The Way We Worked," explores how work became a central element in American culture by tracing the many changes that affected the workforce and work environments over the past 150 years.