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Today's Features

  • An angel of mercy has quietly been providing a great service to the community of Cedar Key for the past 25 years. She does house calls, meets appointments at her Rosewood office, keeps us fit and limber, offers herbal oils, and wraps us in wellness. She is Mary Inskeep, Licensed Massage Therapist.

  • Wondering what the new mandatory motorcycle safety courses are like, but not yet ready enough to leap in?

    As your guinea pig, I recently went to class at Gainesville Motorcycle Safety Training and received my motorcycle endorsement. Here's how it works:

  • Cedar Key native Jeremy Philabaum has been commended by his superiors for his excellent performance on duty.

    Aviation Structural Mechanic (Safety Equipment) Third Class Petty Officer (AME3) Jeremy Philabaum, grandson of Cheryl Philabaum, of Cedar Key, has been awarded the "Maintenance Professional of the Month" Award for the exceptional efforts and performance of his duties.

    AME3 Philabaum is currently in the middle of a six month, multi-site, deployment with Patrol Squadron (VP) Four-Six and Maintenance Detachment Team Alpha (MDT-A) in the Persian Gulf region.

  • Alabama, Johnny Nash, Bertie Higgins, Dennis Yost, Starbuck, Artimus Pyle and Bo Diddley are just a few of a diverse group of stars that Irwin has worked with in his long and storied career.

    Seeing the music industry eat up a lot of his friends, Irwin chose to take the low road some 20 years ago, moving to rural Levy County to chill out, spend time with the family, collect some royalty money and play a little music.

    It's worked out well in some respects.

  • Are the crystal clear Gulf waters and the wonders beneath calling your name?

    Break out your mask and fins! Scallop season began July 1 and runs through Sept. 10.

    Anyone who has scalloped before knows the technique of snorkeling along picking scallops off the bottom of Florida's coastal bay areas.

    This is typically done in 2.5 to 4 feet of water - an excellent activity for the whole family to enjoy. Other techniques involve wading and scooping up scallops with a dip net.

  • The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) announces a series of summer inshore fishing clinics for children at the Senator George Kirkpatrick Marine Lab in Cedar Key. This program is open to youths between the ages of 6 and 16.

    The one day clinics will take place in June and July. Participants will learn about fish identification, knot tying, casting, bait types, habitat types, gear care and more. The clinic will end with catch-and-release pier fishing.

  • There were tears during the slide show and tears at the presentation of flowers, but sunny smiles otherwise reigned Saturday morning as Cedar Key seniors walked into the gymnasium as students and skipped and danced out as alumni.

    The class of 2008 sent 16 seniors into the world this week, led by salutatorian Jaclyn Stefani. Eight scholarship recipients took home more than $6,000 in special awards, plus Florida Bright Futures scholarships which pay up to 75 percent to 100 percent of students' in-state tuition.

  • Jaclyn Stefani doesn't know where she'll be in 10 years. She's not sure where in the world she'd really like to live. But with a career track of Army nursing and her EMT and CNA certificates already under her belt, she's put herself in a great position to find out - one place at a time, if necessary.

    Stefani is the daughter of Peter and Gina Stefani, and Pete's big sister. She has the highest GPA in her graduating class - 3.666, and she'll be Cedar Key School's 2008 salutatorian.

  • With its thrilling juxtaposition of Miami Vice and the Irish Troubles, Pierce Kelley's latest legal thriller, A Tinker's Damn! may be his best work yet.

    Kevin Coffee, Kelley's latest protagonist, is an Irish immigrant growing up in New York City when the story begins. Poverty and prejudice lead him into the criminal world for the benefit of his family. With no father and no outside help, he learns to steal food so his family can eat. As an adult, he develops a morally ambiguous worldview, moving to Mariel boatlift-era Miami to become an opportunistic drug smuggler.

  • Nysie Watson was born to be an herbalist, it seems.

    "All my life I've been aware of an alternate way of healing," she says. "We used to pick mushrooms - shiitake, chantarelles - my mother could name the names of almost all the plants we'd find in the Pacific Northwest."

    She got her degree in Ag. Horticulture from the University of Oregon, but that's not what made her an herbalist.

    No, it took two devastating back injuries and a bout with lymphoma to make Watson an herbalist. The lessons she learned fighting back injuries and cancer made a lifelong impression on her.