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Today's Features

  • The Cedar Key Women’s Club held its Annual Luncheon and Fashion Show, Tuesday at the Community Center in Cedar Key and over 150 women came to enjoy it.

    Several vendors were on hand selling a variety of wares from ceramics to vintage jewelry to household decor items. Most of the clothing and accessories were supplied by Deja Vu on Second Street.

  • You may have walked or driven by a house on Fourth Street numerous times and barely noticed it was there - half hidden behind low limerock walls that terrace the sloping yard and overgrown cabbage palms.  Or, perhaps, you stopped to take a photo of the pair of adirondack chairs, swaths of ferns and pile of bleached out shells on each side of the stairs.

    It is one of those houses that could go either way - photo op or you might pass right by and not look up. 750 Fourth Street - home of Luz Beckham Kraujalis and her husband, Walter. 

  • By Jim Wright

    Here is a possible definition of love – “When people can be totally open with one another and feel totally safe at the same time.”

    I derived this definition from a passage in a book called Will the Real Me Please Stand Up, by John Powell.  It reminds me of a statement I heard many years ago by a member of a church in Tallahassee: “What I like about church is that I can be myself and it is OK.”

  • A new book, "Dark Origins of Valentine’s Day" by Arnie Spiel details the not-so-romantic history of Feb. 14, that includes Roman executions in the 3rd Century.

    Luckily, that was not the case in Cedar Key on Monday, when 150 people met to celebrate at the Community Center and enjoyed a dinner catered by the Island Room and music by the Dock Street Band.

    Among the sold-out crowd at the event, sponsored by the Lion’s Club, were three couples who revealed a thing or two about their relationships and a little bit more. 

  • Cedar Key’s Police Department has a well known leader, Chief Virgil Sandlin. But, the men who make up his force may be less known. I sat down with Cpl. David Perry this week to find out more.

    The Basics: He is 33 years old and in April will have been on the force for six years — his first job out of the police academy. He has been married for “around” eight years and has a four year-old son, also known as “My World”.

  • Cheyenne Clanton, age 13, and a 7th grader at Cedar Key School recently won the 2nd place trophy for the County competition of the Tropicana Speech Contest. This was her 3rd level of competition.

  • A small army of children from Cedar Key and Rosewood descended upon the Community Center Monday night, once they realized that Santa had slipped into town early on a firetruck. The only hint were the Christmas lights that decorated his ride.

    Somehow, he managed to not only get into Cedar Key virtually undetected but he also set up his headquarters - complete with an elf named Teresa.

  • Cedar Key School FAA met 40 of the top FFA teams in the state in the food science competition at the University of Florida on December 4 and came home winners. Cedar Key's Future Farmers of America students included Laia Gore, Brooke Allen, Mikayla Pope, Caitlin Goss, Ariel Alexander, Taryn Epperson, Abby Osteen and Samantha Sapp.

  • This past Saturday at Kona Joe’s Island
    Cafe hosted a book signing for author Terri
    DuLong.
    Her latest book, "Casting About " is the
    second in the Cedar Key series. The first,
    "Spinning Forward," came out last year.
    Additionally, DuLong has a story, "A Cedar
    Key Christmas," that has been included in
    the Christmas Novella "Holiday Magic."
    The collection of four short stories by
    four different authors, has made the New
    York Times best seller list for three weeks
    and was at No. 12 last week. This is the first
    time that a Cedar Key author has made the
    prestigious list.

  •  Now is the perfect time to enjoy Florida's famous oysters. Florida oysters are available year round, but harvest really gears up in fall as water temperatures begin to drop. The cool months are when oysters taste the best.

    Florida's oyster industry is based on the Eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica), which is found from the Yucatan Peninsula in the Gulf of Mexico to the St. Lawrence River in Canada.